Immigrating, with Purpose: Who gets to go and who gets to stay…

  1. Individual: Self care vs Values. Principles and Morals. African Millennials have had tough parenting engraved into their culture. Cultural context often shapes your perspective and the metrics that influence the idea of success and failure. Respect for your parents is most commonly linked to religion and social appearance alongside socially enforced norms are the mines and grenades that African Millennials find themselves navigating around.
  2. Relationships: The Inter-personal Entanglements. When do you say no and yes to people who you ideally would like as friends but do not see as family? It’s a difficult but enlightening journey for anyone; it builds character and shapes one’s being. Imagine a mix of this conflict with professional growth, academic achievements and pivotal life figures taking the stumbling fall from heroes. The drink you have prepared in this swirl of imagination is basically a life cocktail.
  3. Community: The village that raised you. Any African can point out places, pivotal landmarks, songs, events where their own fortune met luck for any opportunity they were given. What is central to our culture is people, story telling and ways of making meaning of the actions that we never forget in our lives. When we could not believe our circumstances having no way out are definitely moments that prompt a change; a move. Growth as a community, as a people, is fundamental to any African, the steps taken behind by people from our past, afford us the future we yearn for. The phrase ‘Ubuntu’ means ‘humanity’. A saying of linkage of a people towards each other.

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